books · mental healt · realistic fiction

Mini-review: The State of Grace by Rachael Lucas

This will be a super mini review because I don’t have much words for it and I still don’t understand why I didn’t actually enjoyed this book.
“State of Grace” is a story about an autistic girl who lives love, family and friendship with Asperger — I generally loved this kind of books but I didn’t have that sparkle with Grace. I just felt like a reader who was reading a story without feeling it.

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Advance Reading Copy · books · realistic fiction · reviews

Arc Review: The Color Project by Sierra Abrams

22892448TITLE:  The Color Project
WRITTEN BY: Sierra Abrams
PUBLISHED BY: Gatekeeper Press
VERSION I READ: e.arc
PAGES: 464
The book will be release on 17th July. Pre-order it NOW!

star4

(PLOT BY GR) Bernice Aurora Wescott has one thing she doesn’t want anyone to know: her name. That is, until Bee meets Levi, the local golden boy who runs a charity organization called The Color Project. Levi is not at all shy about attempting to guess Bee’s real name; his persistence is one of the many reasons why Bee falls for him. But while Levi is everything she never knew she needed, giving up her name would feel like a stamp on forever. And that terrifies her. When unexpected news of an illness in the family drains Bee’s summer of everything bright, she is pushed to the breaking point. Losing herself in The Color Project—a world of weddings, funerals, cancer patients, and hopeful families that the charity funds—is no longer enough. Bee must hold up the weight of her family, but to do that, she needs Levi. She’ll have to give up her name and let him in completely or lose the best thing that’s ever happened to her.
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books · diverse books · mental healt · realistic fiction

Review: Solitaire by Alice Oseman

tumblr_o2ny6tpjnz1u7obnso1_400TITLE:  Solitaire
WRITTEN BY: Alice Oseman
PUBLISHED BY: Harper Collins
VERSION I READ: paperback
PAGES: 392
TRIGGERS: self harm, eating disorder, depression, suicide.

star3.5

(PLOT BY GR) In case you’re wondering, this is not a love story. My name is Tori Spring. I like to sleep and I like to blog. Last year – before all that stuff with Charlie and before I had to face the harsh realities of A-Levels and university applications and the fact that one day I really will have to start talking to people – I had friends. Things were very different, I guess, but that’s all over now.  Now there’s Solitaire. And Michael Holden.
I don’t know what Solitaire are trying to do, and I don’t care about Michael Holden.
I really don’t.

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books · diverse books · realistic fiction · reviews

Review: We come apart by Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan

9781408878859TITLE:  We come apart
WRITTEN BY: Sarah Crossan and Brian Conaghan
PUBLISHED BY: Bloomsbury USA Childrens
VERSION I READ: paperback
PAGES: 320
DIVERSITY: immigration.

star3

(PLOT BY GR) Nicu has emigrated from Romania and is struggling to find his place in his new home. Meanwhile, Jess’s home life is overshadowed by violence. When Nicu and Jess meet, what starts out as friendship grows into romance as the two bond over their painful pasts and hopeful futures. But will they be able to save each other, let alone themselves? For fans of Una LaMarche’s Like No Other, this illuminating story told in dual points of view through vibrant verse will stay with readers long after they’ve turned the last page.
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Advance Reading Copy · books · diverse books · realistic fiction · romance

Arc Review: Things I should have known by Claire LaZebnik

30971706TITLE:  Things I should have known
WRITTEN BY: Claire LaZebnik
PUBLISHED BY: HMH Books for Young Readers
VERSION I READ: e-arc from Netgalley
PAGES: 320
WARNING: realistic fiction about autism and family.

star4

(PLOT BY GR) From the author of Epic Fail comes the story of Chloe Mitchell, a Los Angeles girl on a quest to find love for her autistic sister, Ivy. Ethan, from Ivy’s class, seems like the perfect match. It’s unfortunate that his older brother, David, is one of Chloe’s least favorite people, but Chloe can deal, especially when she realizes that David is just as devoted to Ethan as she is to Ivy. Uncommonly honest and refreshingly funny, this is a story about sisterhood, autism, and first love. Chloe, Ivy, David, and Ethan, who form a quirky and lovable circle, will steal readers’ hearts and remind us all that it’s okay to be a different kind of normal.
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Advance Reading Copy · books · realistic fiction · reviews

Review: Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner

e29c8700-2a5e-0134-0657-062f3a35be5fTITLE:  Goodbye Days
WRITTEN BY: Jeff Zentner
PUBLISHED BY: Andersen Digital
VERSION I READ: e-arc from Netgalley
PAGES: 416
WARNING: HEARTBREAKING and SOBBING.

star4.5

(PLOT BY GR) Can a text message destroy your life?
Carver Briggs never thought a simple text would cause a fatal crash, killing his three best friends, Mars, Eli, and Blake. Now Carver can’t stop blaming himself for the accident and even worse, there could be a criminal investigation into the deaths. Then Blake’s grandmother asks Carver to remember her grandson with a ‘goodbye day’ together. Carver has his misgivings, but he starts to help the families of his lost friends grieve with their own memorial days, along with Eli’s bereaved girlfriend Jesmyn. But not everyone is willing to forgive. Carver’s own despair and guilt threatens to pull him under into panic and anxiety as he faces punishment for his terrible mistake. Can the goodbye days really help?

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Advance Reading Copy · books · realistic fiction · reviews

#MiniReview: hello me, it’s you.

nyericazTITLE:  Hello me, it’s you
WRITTEN BY: Hanna Todd
PUBLISHED BY: Hodder & Stoughton
VERSION I READ: e-arc from netgalley
PAGES: 112
WARNING: grief, depression, anxiety, OCD, mental health.

star3

(PLOT BY GR)Hello Me, it’s You is a collection of letters by young adults aged 17-24 about their experiences with mental health issues. The letters are written to their 16-year-old selves, giving beautifully honest advice, insight and encouragement for all that lays ahead of them. This book was produced by the Hello Me, it’s You charity, set up by the editor, Hannah. Hannah was diagnosed with depression and anxiety whilst at university and found comfort in talking to friends about their experiences, realising she was not alone in her situation. This inspired the idea for the charity and book. Through the creation of materials such as this, the charity aims to provide reassurance for young adults (and their families) who are experiencing mental health issues and give a voice to young adults on such an important topic. The result of that will hopefully be a reduction in the negative stigma surrounding mental health and an increase in awareness of young people’s experiences. All profits go the Hello Me, it’s You charity, for the production of future supportive books. Trigger warning: Due to it’s nature, the content of this book may be triggering. Contains personal experiences of depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, trichotillomania and other mental health issues, as well as issues such as assault.
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